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Seasonal Superfoods

Have you ever thought about winter-specific superfoods and remedies one can make easily ? We all love Apples Contains loads of: Vitamin C, fibre, fruit sugars, protein, good fats and blood sugar balancing cinnamon. The fibre in apples, pectin, is a particular immune protector as it lines the intestinal walls where 70% of our immune system is located. Stewed apples are best for this. Delish apple treats: Thinly slice your favourite apple, put on a serving plate, cover with a little nut butter of your choice (peanut or almond are great), a drizzle of honey and a dash of cinnamon. An irresistible treat for young and old. Root Vegetables and squashes Carrots, Parsnips, turnips, beetroot, sweet p

From Seaweeds to Cultured Foods ... we've had a busy week at Grassroots Nutrition

Having learned what there is to learn about cooking with Seaweed from the wonderful Prannie Rhatigan at www.irishseaweedkitchen.ie last Saturday, Grassroots Nutrition was delighted to be at the launch of the equally wonderful Dervla Reynold's epic cookbook "The Cultured Club" on fermented foods. Fermented foods are essential for good gut health. Fermentation increases healthy bacteria in the food which, when eaten daily, will feed your beneficial gut bacteria and strengthen your immune system this winter. The Cultured Club is a treasure trove of mountains of delicious recipes on fermenting foods. If you are like me, you will be scared of trying your hand at fermented foods. However, do not d

Irish Seaweed Cooking Class

Red. Green. Brown. These are the colours of edible seaweeds that grow on Irish shores. There are over 300 known seaweeds in the Irish seas, and 30 of those have been classed for eating. According to Dr Prannie Rhatigan, you should eat a mix of colours daily. Haven't I been saying it all along? Eat a "rainbow of colours" on your plate daily for good health ... but how does that translate to seaweeds? Being an island, Ireland has a strong culinary tradition of using seaweed in the kitchen. In fact, you may have grown up eating seaweed, or using it as a cure. What's behind these strange-looking, odd-smelling, slimy sea plants? According to world-wide leading authority on seaweeds, Dr Prannie Rh

Greystones, Co. Wicklow

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BSc, DipNT, mNTOI

Nutritional Therapy

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